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GSR 2015

242 ENDNOTES REFERENCE TABLES Wind Energy Association (CWEA) and China Electricity Council, provided by Shi Pengfei, CWEA, personal communication with REN21, 1 April 2015; 2014 data from GWEC, op. cit. this note, p. 7; added 23,196 MW from Feng Zhao et al., Global Wind Market Update—Demand & Supply 2014 (London: FTI Consulting LLP, March 2015), p. 30; National Energy Board, provided by China National Energy Administration, “Wind Power Industry Monitoring,” 12 February 2015, http://www.nea.gov.cn/2015- 02/12/c_133989991.htm (using Google Translate); China Renewable Energy Engineering Institute, “Wind Power Statistical Evaluation Report of China” (in Chinese), 14 April 2015, provided by Shi Pengfei, CWEA, personal communication with REN21, 15 April 2015. Germany: Zhao et al., op. cit. this note, p. 33; GWEC, op. cit. this note, p. 48; BMWi, Development of Renewable Energy Sources in Germany 2014, based on data from the Working Group on Renewable Energy-Statistics (AGEE-Stat), as of February 2015, p. 15, http://www.bmwi.de/English/Redaktion/Pdf/development- of-renewable-energy-sources-in-germany,property=pdf,bereich =bmwi2012,sprache=en,rwb=true.pdf; C. Ender, “Wind Energy Use in Germany – Status 31.12.2014,” DEWI Magazin, February 2015, pp. 26–37, http://www.dewi.de/dewi_res/fileadmin/pdf/ publications/Magazin_46/05.pdf. United States: American Wind Energy Association, “American Wind Power Rebounded in 2014, Adding Over Four Times as Much as Year Before,” press release (Washington, DC: 28 January 2015), http://www.awea. org/MediaCenter/pressrelease.aspx?ItemNumber=7181. Brazil: GWEC, op. cit. this note, pp. 7, 32; Zhao et al., op. cit. this note, p. 37; WWEA, World Wind Energy Report 2015 (Bonn: 2015). India: GWEC, op. cit. this note, p. 7; Zhao et al., op. cit. this note, p. 37; WWEA, op. cit. this note. Canada: GWEC, op. cit. this note, p. 34. United Kingdom: EWEA, Wind in Power: 2014 European Statistics (Brussels, February 2015), http://www.ewea.org/fileadmin/files/ library/publications/statistics/EWEA-Annual-Statistics-2014.pdf; Zhao et al., op. cit. this note, p. 33; GWEC, op. cit. this note, pp. 7, 53, 74. Sweden: EWEA, op. cit. this note. France: EWEA, op. cit. this note. Turkey: Turkish Wind Energy Association, Turkish Wind Energy Statistics Report, January 2015, pp. 4–5, http://www. tureb.com.tr/en/twea-announcements/434-turkish-wind-energy- statistics-report-january-2015. Spain and Italy: EWEA, op. cit. this note, p. 7; Zhao et al., op. cit. this note, pp. 30–31; WWEA, op. cit. this note. World: GWEC, op. cit. this note, p. 7; Zhao et al., op. cit. this note, p. 29; WWEA, op. cit. this note. See Wind Power text and related endnotes for further world and country statistics and details. 11 Table R11 from Frankfurt School-UNEP Centre/BNEF, Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investment 2015 (Frankfurt: 2015), http://www.fs-unep-centre.org 12 Table R12 derived from the following sources: REN21 database; submissions by report contributors; various industry reports; EurObserv’ER, The State of Renewable Energies in Europe (Paris: 2014), http://www.energies-renouvelables.org/observ-er/ stat_baro/barobilan/barobilan14_EN.pdf. For online updates, see the “Renewables Interactive Map” at www.ren21.net. 13 Table R13 derived from the following sources: REN21 database; submissions by report contributors; various industry reports; EurObserv’ER; Targets for the EU-28 were set in each country's National Renewable Energy Action Plan (NREAP), available at http://ec.europa.eu/energy/en/topics/renewable-energy/ national-action-plans. Certain NREAP targets have been revised subsequently. For online updates, see the “Renewables Interactive Map” at www.ren21.net. 14 Table R14 from REN21 database compiled from all available policy references plus submissions from report contributors. Targets for the EU-28 and Energy Community countries were set in each country's NREAP. Certain NREAP targets have been revised subsequently. For online updates, see the “Renewables Interactive Map” at www.ren21.net. 15 Table R15 derived from the following sources: REN21 database compiled from all available policy references plus submissions from report contributors; MNRE, “IREEED: Indian Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Policy Database,” www.ireeed.gov. in, viewed 3 March 2015; N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, “Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency,” www. dsireusa.org, viewed 3 March 2015. 16 Table R16 derived from the following sources: all available policy references, including the IEA/IRENA online Global Renewable Energy Policies and Measures database, published sources as given in the endnotes for the Policy Landscape section of this report, and submissions from report contributors. Additional policies added include: Andorra: LAWIN, Global Renewable Energy Guide (Ankara, Turkey: Cakmak Publishing, 2013), http:// www.lawin.com/files/global_renewable_energy_guide_2013. pdf; Liechtenstein: Jorn Banasiak, “Feed-in Tariff,” RES Legal, updated 24 November 2014, http://www.res-legal.eu/search- by-country/liechtenstein/single/s/res-e/t/promotion/aid/feed- in-tariff-3/lastp/409/; San Marino: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, The Second Communication of the Republic of San Marino to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, 28 January 2013, http://unfccc.int/ resource/docs/natc/smrnc2.pdf. 17 Table R17 derived from Ibid. 18 Table R18 lists only biofuel blend mandates; transport and biofuel targets can be found in Table R15. Source: Table R18 from ibid. and from Jim Lane, “Biofuels Mandates Around the World: 2015,” Biofuels Digest, 31 December 2014, http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2014/12/31/ biofuels-mandates-around-the-world-2015/. 19 Table R19 derived from the following sources: For selected targets and policies, see: EU Covenant of Mayors; ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability; REN21, Global Futures Report (Paris: 2013); and REN21, ISEP, and ICLEI, 2011 Global Status Report on Local Renewable Energy Policies (Paris: May 2011). For selected examples in urban planning, see: City of Malmö, “Environmental Programme for the City of Malmö 2009-2020” (Malmö: 2009), http://malmo.se/ download/18.6301369612700a2db9180006235/Environmental- Programme-for-the-City-of-Malmo-2009-2020.pdf; IRENA, Renewable Energy Policy in Cities: Selected Case Studies - Malmö, Sweden (Abu Dhabi: January 2013), https://www.irena.org/ Publications/RE_Policy_Cities_CaseStudies/IRENA%20cities%20 case%207%20Malmo.pdf; and City of Sydney, Decentralised Energy Master Plan Renewable Energy (Sydney: 2013), http://www. cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/153282/ Renewable-Energy-Master-Plan.pdf 20 Table R20 derived from the following sources: REN21 database; IEA, World Energy Outlook 2014, Energy Access Database, http://www.worldenergyoutlook.org/resources/ energydevelopment/energyaccessdatabase/; submissions from report contributors; and from World Bank, “Rwanda Electricity Access Scale-up and Sector Wide Approach (SWAp) Development Project (P111567): Implementation Status and Results Report” (Washington, DC: 7 January 2015), http://documents.worldbank. org/curated/en/2015/01/23181044/rwanda-rwanda-electricity- access-scale-up-sector-wide-approach-swap-development- project-p111567-implementation-status-results-report- sequence-10 21 Table R21 derived from IEA, World Energy Outlook 2014, Energy Access Database, http://www.worldenergyoutlook.org/ resources/energydevelopment/energyaccessdatabase/, and from submissions from report contributors. 22 Table R22 derived from the following sources: All consolidated data at country level were provided by REN21 country contributors and topical (DRE) contributors. Programme and organisational information was provided by Alliance for Rural Electrification (ARE); Asian Development Bank (ADB); Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ); Foundation Rural Energy Services (FRES); Global Off-Grid Lighting Association (GOGLA); Inter-American Development Bank (IDB); Mobisol; Plan International Spain; Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Promotion in International Cooperation (REPIC); SNV Netherlands Development Organisation; and Sunna Design. Systems/projects installed by ARE members are based on consolidated 2014 data that ARE collected from its members in April 2015. (Respondents to ARE’s survey include: EDP - Energias de Portugal, FRES, Fundacion Accioná Microenergia, Generalia, Iberdrola, Mobisol, Off-Grid Energy Australia, Phaesun, Rahimafrooz, Smart Hydro Power, Socomec, Solarland, and SunEdison). Systems/projects implemented under the EnDev Programme were provided by GIZ and based on EnDev figures as of end-2014. Systems/projects implemented by GOGLA and the World Bank were provided by GOGLA and represent the sales of GOGLA members and of products that have been quality verified by the Lighting Global Quality Assurance Program. MNRE, Annual Report 2014, http:// mnre.gov.in/file-manager/annual-report/2014-2015/EN/index. htm; ONE (National Electricity Utility in Morocco), Programme d’Electrification Rurale Global, http://www.one.org.ma/FR/pages/ interne.asp?esp=2&id1=6&t1=1, viewed 26 April 2015. BACK

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