GSR2018 now launched!

This year’s Renewables 2018 Global Status Report GSR reveals two realities: one in which a revolution in the power sector is driving rapid change towards a renewable energy future, and another in which the overall transition is not advancing with the speed needed.   Click here to access the GSR 2018 microsite where you can read all about specific market, investment and policy development. The site allows you to read the full report on-line and link directly to all the references, you can even translate the site into another language. A separate link allows you to download the full report as a PDF if that is your preferred option. There is also a link to the Highlights 2018 document which outlines the broad trends that defined the renewables sector in 2018. Click here to get started.

Be a Part of the Data Collection for the next Global Status Report

REN21 has a begun its data collection process for the Renewables 2018 Global Status Report. Be a part of the team that produces the industry standard on the status of renewables!   The 2018 report will include new chapters on enabling technologies and systems integration, and corporate renewable energy.  You can join this process by completing a short Expression of Interest  form. Data collection begins in October 2017.  See the EOI form for the complete timeline for data collection and peer review.   And, just in case you wondered how GSR data was used outside of the report, REN21 is pleased to announce the start of a Massive On-line Course (MOOC), “Off-grid Renewable Energy Systems”.  Developed by the Institute for Sustainable Energy, this course contains two modules about distributed renewable energy, which draws extensively on the distributed renewable energy content in the GSR2017.  The course begins 30 October,2017. For more information, click here.

GSR2017

This year’s edition reveals a global energy transition well underway with record new additions on installed renewable energy capacity, rapidly falling costs, and the decoupling of economic growth and energy-related carbon dioxide emissions for the third year running.     But despite these positive trends the pace of the transition is not on track to achieve the goals established in the Paris Agreement.  Read about the evolution of renewables over the course of 2016 here.